Meek Mill Enters Prison, Attorney Says Judge Has Vendetta Against Him

By Staff  |  11/08/2017

Meek Mill

Following news that he was sentenced to 2-4 years in prison for a probation violation, Meek Mill has re-entered the prison system.

TMZ obtained this new mugshot of the Philly rapper from Pennsylvania's Dept. of Corrections, who say he's currently being process.

As reported earlier this week, Meek Mill appeared in a Philadelphia courtroom on Monday (Nov. 6), where a judge ruled that he had violated the terms of his probation and handed down a 2-4 year sentence.

Earlier this year, he was arrested for fighting a St. Louis airport fight, then for reckless driving in NYC. While both charges were dropped, the judge said that the arrests alone were violations.

Following the ruling and Meek being handcuffed, his attorney Joe Tacopina told Billboard that Meek's camp feels his punishment was unjust. “It was an enormously grave mischaracter of justice," he said. "A really despicable version of what the justice system is supposed to be."

Tacopina went on to say that Judge Genece Brinkley went against the prosecutor’s and district attorney’s recommendation for no prison time. "But this judge, excoriated both of them, challenged their credibility and overrode both law enforcement agencies recommendations and went from zero to two to four years, which shows that she clearly had a personal vendetta against this guy," Tacopina said.

He said Judge Brinkley was “inappropriate”, while claiming she crossed "the line of professionalism and traditional conduct." He claims that Brinkley requested Mill re-record Boyz II Men’s "On Bended Knee" with a personal shoutout to her. "[Meek Mill], of course, was laughing and thought it was a joke. She said, ‘I’m serious.’ He refused to do that. So, that, right there, was a totally an inappropriate request."

That's not it either. Tacopina also made that request that Meek Mill leave Roc Nation. "When she requests he leaves his current management Roc Nation — which is one of the most important management companies in the world — and goes back to a local Philadelphia guy who has a spotted past because she had a personal relationship with him as manager, again, she’s doing something that a judge would never be doing, having a personal interest. Another really credible example is she stopped him for violation of probation was when he went to Atlanta for a rehabilitation clinic, without her approval she said. Then, we showed her the e-mail, in which the request was made for him to go to Atlanta for rehabilitation, and she approved it, but she said that she never got it, even though she was CC’d on it and that it was addressed to her."