DJ Quik Recalls Signing With Suge Knight Before Death Row

By Staff  |  10/13/2014

DJ Quik

With his new album The Midnight Life in stores this week, Compton rap legend DJ Quik stopped by SiriusXM and recalled his history.

During his chat on "Sway In The Morning," he detailed his early career, signing with Suge Knight and D.O.C.'s Funky Enough label in 1989, before he eventually left to sign to Profile Records following a bidding war.

"Actually, the first time I got together with Suge was way before I got a record deal," he explained. "It was like 1989. He and D.O.C. started a label called Funky Enough. They signed us ... He was Suge back then. That was before Death Row. Before he even met Dre, he was just Suge, you know? I ended -- I got out of the deal with Suge and ended up getting into a bidding war between Select Records and Profile Records [in] 1990... and ended up going with Profile. They outbid Select. I ended up being the highest signing that they ever did to that day ... I wanted to sign with [Eazy-E], but E and them was busy."

Quik goes on to briefly talk about the Death Row Records era, referring to that time as "significant."

"It was significant," he said, when asked about the Death Row era. "I think at that point Suge was just -- He became real powerful from Interscope ... Suge wanted to look out for all the artists he felt weren't getting taken care of in the industry. So, that's why we all gravitated towards him. At that point I was going through it with Profile. Profile had this thing where [when] they didn't want to pay you, they put you on suspension. 'My artist is on suspension.' So, I stayed on suspension because they didn't want to pay me. It was just weird, so Suge stepped in. Became my manager."

Later, the conversation shifted toward gang culture, and Quik offered his thoughts on Lil Wayne and Chris Brown's alleged ties to the Bloods gang, which called both "honoring" and "laughable."

"It's kind of honoring, but it's laughable too at the same time," Quik said. "They don't really know what that sh*t is about. We took that sh*t way seriously. We were trying to survive through that sh*t. They got it too easy."