Guerilla Black Pleads Guilty To Credit Card Fraud Charges

Guerilla Black

Guerilla Black, best known for his 2004 single “Compton,” is facing prison time after pleading guilty to identity theft and bank fraud charges.

According to Patch.com, the Compton rapper (real name: Charles Tony Williamson) appeared in court Tuesday (July 9) and entered a guilty plea for his part in a credit card fraud scheme that racked up hundreds of thousands in losses — a little more than 100 of those cards resulted in a financial loss of nearly $150,000, officials said. A total amount hasn’t been officially revealed.

He was arrested back in January, along with four others who were apprehended various locations around L.A. county. At the time, the rapper was already on a pre-trial release after being indicted by federal authorities in Washington on fraud charges last summer.

Black (real name: Charles Tony Williamson) allegedly purchased credit card numbers from hackers.

Others involved in the scheme have been sentenced. David Schrooten, a Dutch hacker known as “Fortezza”, received 12 years in prison for his role, and Christopher Schroebel received 7 years.

Black pleaded guilty to conspiracy and unauthorized access to a protected computer to facilitate fraud, both carry a penalty of up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. Other charges include access device fraud (up to 15 years and $250,000 fine), bank fraud (up to 30 years and $1 million fine), and aggravated identity theft, which carries a minimum sentence of two years consecutive to any other prison terms resulting from the case.

So yea, he’s facing a lot of time.

Guerilla Black was on the rise in the mid-2000s with the release of his 2005 debut, Guerilla City. While he garnered nationwide recognition and a push from Jive Records, he was meant with resistance, simply because he sounded too much like the late Notorious B.I.G.

He remained active in music in the years following, releasing various singles and mixtapes, his last being 2009’s The Blacktapes. However, he’s remained under the radar.

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