Lloyd BanksIf you haven’t heard it by now, last week, G-Unit’s Lloyd Banks dropped the official “Beamer, Benz, Bentley” remix, boasting a slew of superstars. This week, he spoke with MTV’s Shaheem Reid to explain the mega-remix, which features Jadakiss, Ludacris, Yo Gotti and The-Dream.

If you’ve heard the track, you probably noticed, Banks switched things up, changing the popular beat that’s been used for unofficial remixes and freestyles countless times. The G-Unit soldier says he made the choice to distigish it from all those versions already out there.

“The beat change lets people know off the rip ‘This is the official remix.’ I’m pretty sure they’ll be blending the original beat in with it anyway,” Banks said.

Below is the breakdown by Banks about how each artist got on the track, as told to MTV:

The-Dream: “I had spoke to couple of different R&B artists. That’s an element that I think helps. Everybody wants to be a part of that record. I don’t think it has to be kept to one lane. I’ve heard Spanish versions to [the original], Jamaican versions to it, Haitian versions to it. I got a feel of what the melodic feel would bring to the record. The-Dream, he was already doing [his own version]. Once I caught wind of it, I was like, ‘Yo, let me get that. Don’t put that out.’ ”

Yo Gotti: “Yo Gotti, I had spoke to him directly. I spoke to him a couple times, told him I wanted to get something done with him. Before that opportunity presented itself, the [song] bubbled all down south in Memphis. I was like, ‘Let’s get Gotti on it.’ He has the street in a chokehold. We’ll probably have more records come in the future also. He definitely has a lane, man, and I wish him luck.”

Ludacris: “Luda, that’s the homie, man. Just through that, [it] wasn’t really nothing [difficult]. Luda is out there bubbling, platinum plaques and all that, #1 records, where I’m trying to take it. Shout-out to Luda and shout-out to [Disturbing Tha Peace co-founder] Chaka [Zulu] for making that happen.

Jadakiss: “That wasn’t nothing. That wasn’t nothing but a phone call. I spoke to him a few times about the record. I had his verse for a minute. I had his verse while I was overseas and everyone was leaking their versions. We built the beat around his verse. He adds that extra, that lyrical element, that New York City vibe to it. I didn’t want to stand alone on that joint.”