Thrasher: There’s More Than Gangsters In Cali

By The Mic Fiend  |  08/15/2008

ThrasherEvery once in awhile, we come across an artist who cares more about his music than his image, and is comfortable being their self. Ladies and gentlemen, this is one of those artists. His name is Thrasher, a fast up-and-coming artist from Orange County, California. Relax as he tells you how the West has finally won. First off where did your name originate?

Thrasher: I got the name from skateboarding world. I'm from the suburbs, Orange County to be exact. I'm not your average West Coast artist. We got artists from all over -- the Bay, Compton. But none has ever come from Orange County. So how long you been in the skateboarding culture?

Thrasher: I was heavy into skating as a kid. I don't really do it anymore. I'm not trying to get out there and hurt myself now. But that doesn't mean I don't have the love for it anymore though. I really started around 8, and stopped at about 15 or so. How and why did you make the transition from skating to hip-hop artist?

Thrasher: Basically the lifestyle up in Orange County is either skating or BMX. Do I just want to incorporate the music with that and bring it into the community? You know give the youth something else to keep them out of trouble. There are now a couple avenues kids can follow to keep them from doing stupid stuff. There aren't too many role models from Orange County in hip-hop, so I wanted to give them someone they can really relate to. We got Snoop and Game, but we don't relate, because we not gangsters over here. How long you been getting into actually making music?

Thrasher: I have been making music for about four years now. Right when I graduated from high school at age 17, and now I'm 21. I read about Jordan brand supporting you. How did that come about?

Thrasher: My Godfather is the head marketing guy over at Jordan brand, so he's been lacing me with fly kicks since I was about 6 or 7. That's what we were into growing up. Kicks are an important part of the skating culture. So too keep it 100% real, I got to incorporate that part of my life to the music. Word is you in the studio with The Game. What can we expect from you being in there with that caliber artist?

Thrasher: I was working with his camp for a minute. I have known Game since I was about 16 or so. His camp is showing me the ropes -- you know studio tricks, industry insight, just helping me through it. I actually used to play ball with The Game at Valley College. So when I told him I was making music, it was love from the beginning. I was in the studio everyday for the recording of LAX. I respect The Game a lot, he's one of the best artists out right now. What's the relationship with you and Jordan Farmer?

Thrasher: Oh yes sir, that's my brother right there. So I take it you a big Lakers fan?

Thrasher: I used to be a Clips fan, but I made the transition to support my people. I just have to say "Go Cleveland."

Thrasher: (Laughs) You know I got to roll with my boy. We got our own little group called Cali's finest. Me, Jordan Farmar, my man Matt Cook, and my boy Young Menace. We all got the same tattoo on our left wrist. It's a barcode with Cali's finest on it. We are all doing our thing from basketball to music, to modeling, and we grew up together. It's crazy. How do you feel about the state of West Coast music right now? Do you feel the West is getting the respect it deserves?

Thrasher: I feel like it's coming along. It's getting better each year, with every new artist that breaks. The music is definitely growing and being embraced. That's good for artists like me, Tyga, and Glasses Malone, bringing something new to the industry. Can you explain the inspiration behind your single "The Way She Feel?"

Thrasher: Man, I was just in the house chillin'. It was a beautiful day outside, and I was thinking I need to make a feel good song. I needed a good summer track to express how we feel in the summer. I just talked about a regular day in Cali. I love the ladies in the summer so it was a perfect fit.